Hasan Nuhanović was an interpreter for the United Nations in Srebrenica and saw his family murdered when the town fell to the Bosnian Serb Army. In the years since he has campaigned for justice for the victims of Srebrenica.
Hasan Hasanović was 19 when the town of Srebrenica fell to Bosnian Serb forces in July 1995. He endured a 100 kilometre march through hostile terrain to escape the massacre of over 7,000 Muslim men and boys that took place there.
This testimony has been provided to HMDT by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. Bosnian Muslim Besima describes returning to the home she was forced from in Prijedor, and confronting the people farming her land.
Nisad was imprisoned in the notorious Omarska Concentration Camp along with four of his brothers. Today he lives in London, is married with two children and works as a civil engineer.
Kemal Pervanić and his family were Muslims living in Kevljani, Bosnia. In 1992 Bosnian Serb forces imprisoned Kemal and his brother in the notorious Omarska concentration camp. As part of our 2011 Hidden Histories project Kemal showed us a photograph of his family which survived the Bosnian war.
This testimony has been provided to the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. In this testimony Kemal remembers the day the Serb army rolled into the village.
This testimony has been provided to HMDT by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. In the film Šero recounts being taken away to be tortured: 'One day they decided they decided that we were in the way they would be better off without us'.
Safet is a Bosnian Muslim and survivor of the ethnic cleansing in Prijedor, Bosnia. His father and brother were imprisoned by the Bosnian Serb army in concentration camps.
The Srebrenica memorial centre was created in October 2000, barely five years after the genocide that took place there. The cemetery, which now holds over 5,000 of the 8,000 victims, has since been joined by a memorial room and exhibition. In spite of local controversy, it has encouraged many survivors to return to the town, and draws in visitors and dignitaries from across the world to hear its message.