Arts

Holocaust Memorial Day is an opportunity for everyone to remember the Holocaust, Nazi Persecution and subsequent genocides. There is no set format for activities and we encourages everyone to commemorate HMD in a way which is relevant to their own lives and communities.
 
Perpetrators of genocide attempted to destroy all traces of the cultures of the people they attempted to annihilate. During the Holocaust many Jewish people asserted their identity and humanity by preserving their culture in the worst of circumstances. Helping to keep alive the culture of a targeted people by including an artistic performance in your HMD event can be moving and profound.  
 
The experiences of those who were murdered and survivors of genocide have inspired a wide range of artistic work including music, dance, drama and poetry. We provide a range of resources and suggested ideas for commemorating HMD through artistic performances.
 

HMD 2017: How can life go on?

Holocaust Memorial Day Trust (HMDT) is seeking 12 groups (one per region or nation of the UK) to create a permanent artwork in their local community which commemorates Holocaust Memorial Day.

In keeping with our theme for this year's HMD, How can life go on?, the artworks created will explore the themes identified for this year's HMD Arts Programme - motifs of absence and the roots needed for life to regrow after a genocide.

The permanent artworks could include sculpture, murals, mosaics, gardens, pathways or structures - there are many possibilities, and we would love a broad range of ideas!

For more information about this project and details of how to apply please see the documents below:

HMD 2017 arts programme information

HMD 2017 arts programme application form 

Deadline for applications: 9am, Friday 30 September 2016

 

Memory Makers

Our Memory Makers project paired Holocaust and genocide survivors with nine British artists, who explored their stories through writing, poetry, film, ceramics, illustration and collage for Holocaust Memorial Day 2015. Memory Makers ensured that survivors’ experiences were not lost to history, and that a new generation could engage with these important stories of genocide. 

Members of the public were also encouraged to submit their own personal artistic responses for Holocaust Memorial Day 2015. If you are interested in trying this you might find our activity sheet useful in helping you get started

Ceramicist Clare Twomey’s work ‘Humanity is in our Hands’ which formed part of the Memory Makers project will continue throughout Holocaust Memorial Day 2016.

Moving Portraits

As part of the project we commissioned five unique survivor portraits that picture these individuals holding objects that help to Keep the memory alive for them. What is so striking about these photographs is that each one has one subtly moving element.
 
Child survivor of the Holocaust Joan Salter holding a photo of her in Portugal ahead of her voyage of escape to the US 
 
You can download Moving Portraits to use as part of your Holocaust Memorial Day event, whether you want to project them on a screen or a wall in the background or have them as a centrepiece of the programme to bring to life the important stories they embody.
 
If you have any enquiries about these projects please email arts@hmd.org.uk.