Testimonies of Holocaust and genocide survivors give us a unique insight into the experience of those who have suffered exclusion and persecution.

It’s not possible for a survivor to attend every HMD event that is held in the UK, so organisers may wish to consider inviting a local community or faith leader or young people from their area to read extracts from the survivor stories we supply.

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David Berger was born in 1915 in Przemysl, south-east Poland. He left his hometown when the Germans invaded in 1939 and was shot dead in Vilnius, Lithuania two years later in 1941 at just 19 years of age.
Holocaust survivor Esther Brunstein was 11 when Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany. In this testimony, Esther describes life before the War, anti-semitic persecution, life in the Łódź Ghetto, deportation to Auschwitz, and life after liberation.
Istvan Domonkos was a young Hungarian Jew whose father was an administrator for the Budapest Jewish Council. In this testimony he describes Nazi persecution of Hungarian Jews, the death of his mother, and how Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg enabled him and his father to escape from Hungary.
Nicole David and her parents were living in Belgium when Nazi Germany invaded in 1940. In this testimony she describes growing up as a young girl in constant fear of arrest and deportation, living in hiding, separation from her parents, and the deportation of her mother.
Holocaust survivor Ruzena Deutschova was deported from Slovakia to Auschwitz in 1944. In this testimony she describes being separated from her mother and siblings during selection at Auschwitz, surviving the War, and rebuilding her life as a Jewish Slovakian.
Lily Ebert was 14 when the Nazis deported her from her Hungarian hometown to Auschwitz. As part of our 2011 Hidden Histories project Lily talked about the gold pendant which remarkably survived the Camp with her.
In this film Holocaust survivor Lily Ebert describes her journey from her Hungarian hometown of Bonyhád to Auschwitz, and how she kept her gold pendant with her throughout her experience.
Terry Farago was taken to Auschwitz from her home in Hungary at the age of 17. Terry tells her story in this film produced by the Welsh Government.
Holocaust survivor Harry Fox was nine when the Nazis took over his town in central Poland. This short summary of his life describes life in a ghetto, as a slave labourer, in a succession of concentration camps, and on a death march. Harry Fox died in 2012.
Holocaust survivor Regina Franks survived Auschwitz and a death march through the depths of winter. Her granddaughter recounted her life story at the 2009 HMD UK Commemoration event.
Holocaust survivor Roman Halter survived in the Łódź Ghetto for nearly four years before it was liquidated and he was sent to Auschwitz. In this testimony he describes surviving as a slave labourer, escaping a death march, and the tragic consequences for a German couple who sheltered him and two of his friends as the war neared its end. Roman Halter died in 2012.
This podcast is a recording of Holocaust survivor Kitty Hart-Moxon's speech from the UK commemoration event for Holocaust Memorial Day 2013, in which she spoke about her life story.
Hedy Klein was born in Oradea, in Romania, and was 16 when the Nazis entered her hometown, which had been absorbed into Hungary and renamed Nagyvarad. She was taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, and then worked as a slave labourer in a munitions factory. After the war, she left Romania illegally and went to Canada.
HMDT Honorary President Ben Helfgott MBE grew up in Poland. He spent his formative years as a slave labourer, in a ghetto, and in several concentration camps. This educational life story describes Ben's experiences during the war, and his remarkable life after settling in the UK as a 15 year old.
This documentary film follows the story of 89 year old Holocaust survivor Iby Knill. In July 1944 in Auschwitz Iby promised a young twin that she would tell the world about her story. It took 60 years before Iby could finally talk about what happened in Auschwitz.
Iby Knill was transported to Auschwitz from Hungary in 1944. As part of our 2011 Hidden Histories project Iby told us about her father's watch chain. Her father threw the chain to Iby's brother as he was being marched away to be deported to his death.
Zahava Kohn is a Holocaust survivor. Sixty years after her liberation she found a mysterious suitcase tucked away at the back of a cupboard with no idea what it would contain. This chance find would reveal a wealth of incredible artefacts from those wartime years, including photographs, documents and letters. Surviving the decades after the war, these relics were discovered in pristine condition and provide a fascinating insight into how Zahava’s family weathered the storm of Nazi persecution.
Jack Kagan grew up in Novogrodek, in modern day Belarus. He fought as part of the Jewish partisan resistance. Here, he talks about the Magen David from Novogrodek's synagogue, all that is left from a once thriving Jewish culture in the town.
Janusz Korczak was an inspirational teacher and writer who cared passionately about the rights and welfare of children. He founded an orphanage in Warsaw and stayed with the children through the Ghetto and transport to the Treblinka death camp.
In this life story for HMD 2014, Freddie describes his journey - fleeing Austria to Belgium, imprisonment in a camp in France, deportation to Auschwitz and a death march to Bergen-Belsen.
20 year old Trude Levi was deported to Auschwitz from Budapest in 1944. In this harrowing testimony she describes conditions in the camp, life as a slave labourer at Buchenwald, and on death marches at the end of the war. Trude Levi died in 2012.
Anita Lasker-Wallfisch played the cello in the orchestra at Auschwitz, surviving for nearly a year. Here she describes her wartime experiences, surviving the Holocaust, and being liberated from the horrendous conditions at Bergen-Belsen.
Malka Levine was born in 1939 in Vladimir-Volinsk in western Ukraine. Her mother managed to protect and hide her three children throughout the Holocaust, first surviving in the town's ghetto, and then hiding for nine months in a hole in a local farmer's barn.
Ladislaus Löb was born in Romania. At the age of 11 he was sent to Bergen-Belsen. He survived the Holocaust but lost the majority of his family.
Philipp Manes was a Jewish businessman living in Berlin. In 1942 he was sent to Theresiesnstadt Concentration Camp where he participated in the Jewish self-administration of the Camp. He was transported to Auschwitz in 1944. In this podcast Dr Klaus Leist reads excerpts of the book As if it were life by Philipp Manes.
Sabina Miller and her family were forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto, where they contracted typhus. Her parents died, but Sabina managed to escape and survive the war by hiding out in the Polish countryside and living under assumed identities. As part of our HMD 2011 Hidden Histories project Sabina told us about the cardigan her mother bought her just before war broke out in 1939. For HMD 2015 Sabina met with illustrator Kimberley Burrows as part of our Memory Makers project.
Susan was born in Hungary in 1930, and was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau in May 1944. Her mother was murdered and her brother had to work in the gas chambers. Susan worked as a slave labourer before narrowly escaping death at Bergen-Belsen, where she was liberated in April 1945.
Filmmaker and animator Gemma Green-Hope met Holocaust survivor Ivor Perl at his family home. Ivor was just 12 years old when he was taken to Auschwitz, and survived with the help of his older brother and several strokes of fortune. Gemma and Ivor discussed family, memory and hope – and how the lessons of the past can shape our future. Gemma created this animated response to Ivor’s story.
Imprisoned in the Warsaw Ghetto along with hundreds of thousands of Jews, and correctly believing that they were facing certain death, the historian Emanuel Ringelblum organised the Oneg Shabbat archive to record the details of their life and the conditions in the ghetto. The archive was code named Oneg Shabbat, meaning ‘the pleasures of the Sabbath’.
Every Holocaust survivor has a different story. This is certainly true for the story of the three Oppenheimer children, Eve, Rudi and Paul, who were fortunate to survive for five years under the Nazis in Holland, and in the camps of Westerbork and Bergen-Belsen, and who finished up on ‘The Last Train from Belsen'.
Avram and Vera were drawn by artist Gideon Summerfield as part of his project From Generation to Generation (L’Dor V’Dor). Avram and Vera are both survivors of the Holocaust and have been married for 62 years.
In this podcast Holocaust survivor Dr Martin Stern talks about his story. Martin was born in 1938 and lived in Holland. He survived the camps of both Westerbork and Theresienstadt.
The Sonderkommando, or ‘Special Squads’, were work units in the Nazi death camps. They consisted of male, mainly Jewish, prisoners who were forced to work in and around the crematoria of several of the Nazi death camps. Members of the Sonderkommando would be regularly replaced, with the new members being responsible for taking the bodies of their predecessors to the crematoria once they too had been murdered in the gas chambers.
In this testimony Holocaust survivor Renee Salt describes conditions in the ghetto in Zdunska-Vola in Poland, the agony of repeated 'selections', transport to Auschwitz, slave labour, and liberation in horrific conditions at Bergen-Belsen.
Janine Webber was born in Lvov in 1932. She survived the Holocaust by moving between hiding places in occupied Poland, witnessing the Nazis seizing her brother and father in the process.
In this detailed testimony Alec Ward describes life in Polish ghettos, escape, recapture, slave labour in Skarzysko Kamienna, Chestochowa, Buchenwald, and Flossberg, and the death march to Mauthausen Concentration Camp before liberation. He explains why he believes he survived, and talks about his life in the UK since the War.
Rudolf Vrba escaped from Auschwitz-Birkenau so he could warn Hungary Jews about their imminent extermination.
Simon Winston is from the Ukraine. He is a survivor of the Holocaust. In this Untold Stories film he speaks about the experience of escaping the Ghetto with his family and living in hiding.
“They arrested my Dad the day he had his monthly pay packet in his pocket. They closed our bank account and refused my mum a working card, telling her that there was neither work nor help for vermin," Simone Arnold Liebster.
Despite being both gay and Jewish, Gad Beck survived the entire duration of Nazi rule living in Berlin. He was 19 when in 1941 his friends and neighbours began to be rounded up and deported. He made the decision to actively resist Nazi Persecution, assuming a leading role in the Chug Chaluzi Jewish resistance group.
Rudolf Brazda was the last known concentration camp survivor deported specifically for homosexuality. Twice imprisoned for homosexuality, he was deported to Buchenwald concentration camp in 1942 where he was subject to forced labour for 32 months.
Albrecht Becker was an actor and production designer, who lived with his partner in Würzburg, Bavaria. He was arrested, put on trial and imprisoned for being gay. He survived the war and died in 2002.
Waldemar Nods was the grandson of a slave from Suriname, who moved to the Netherlands in 1927, aged 19. He had a son – Waldy – with his Dutch wife – Rika – and together they hid Jews from the Nazis during the German occupation. They were caught and deported to concentration camps in Germany.
Helene Melanie Lebel was one of approximately 250,000 people murdered by the Nazis because they were physically or mentally disabled.
Amalie Schaich is a German Romani survivor of Nazi Persecution. She was separated from her parents at the age of nine, before being sent to Auschwitz in 1944. She was one of only four children to have been selected to be a labourer in Auschwitz, while the other children in her group were sent to the gas chambers.
Pierre Seel grew up in France, and was imprisoned by the Nazis for being gay at the age of 17. This life story explains how Pierre spoke out about his persecution.
‘The girl with the headscarf’ was identified by Dutch journalist Aad Wagenaar in the early 1990s as Romani girl Anna Maria ‘Settela’ Steinbach. Here, Rainer Schulze, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Essex, shares her story.
Ceija Stojka was a Romany Gypsy who was persecuted by the Nazis. She was deported with 200 members of her extended family to Auschwitz where most of them were murdered upon arrival. In later life Ceija Stojka spent her time promoting the rights of Roma people, highlighting through her experiences what can happen when prejudice and hatred are allowed to take hold.
Johann ‘Rukeli’ Trollmann was born on 27 December 1907 near Hannover. He was a popular German Sinto boxer, who was discriminated against, marginalised, sterilised, and finally deported to a concentration camp, where he was murdered. Here, Rainer Schulze, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Essex, shares his story.
Var was working as an English teacher in Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, and her husband was working for UNESCO in Paris, when the Khmer Rouge took control of the city. This written testimony was shared for HMD 2014 - Journeys.
Cambodian Genocide survivor Denise Affonço and her family were forced from the capital Phnom Penh to toil as slave farmers for four years. Her husband was taken away by the Khmer Rouge, never to be seen again, and her daughter died of starvation. This testimony is an extract from her book, 'To the End of Hell'.
In this film for HMD 2014, survivor of the Genocide in Cambodia Var Ashe Houston describes being forced from her home by the Khmer Rouge.
Sokphal Din was born in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. After the city fell to the Khmer Rouge, he and his family were among those driven into the killing fields. In this film he describes his experiences.
Arn Chorn-Pond was born in 1966 in Battambang, the second largest city in Cambodia, in south-east Asia. When the Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia, Arn was sent with hundreds of other children to a prison camp. He survived by entertaining soldiers with his flute-playing.
Mardi Seng was 10 years old when the Khmer Rouge took over Phnom Penh. Mardi and his family were forced from the city to live as farmers in the countryside. They survived four years of slave labour and terror, including five months in a prison camp.
In this education case study from 2012 we highlight the story of Chum Mey, one of the few people to survive the infamous Tuol Sleng prison in Cambodia. Chum Mey's family were killed during the Genocide in Cambodia. Chum Mey testified at the trial of Kaing Guek Eav- the Khmer Rouge's Comrade Duch.
Cambodian Genocide survivor Sophal Leng Stagg endured three years surrounded by starvation, sickness and death, but survived to tell her story.
Ronnie Yimsut was 13 years old when the Khmer Rouge took power. He and his extended family were removed from their homes and forced to work in collective camps. During the last week of 1977, Ronnie's family was rounded up and killed by the Khmer Rouge. Of the dozens killed that day, only Ronnie survived.
Genocide survivor Clare lost her family in the violence which engulfed Rwanda in 1994. She was repeatedly raped and left mutilated after being left for dead in a killing pit. Here she describes her experiences.
Daphrose is a survivor of the Genocide in Rwanda and this is her testimony.
In this written testimony for HMD 2014 Appolinaire Kageruka shared his life story about surviving the Genocide in Rwanda.
Appolinaire Kageruka was 24 years old, and working as a teacher, when the Genocide in Rwanda began in 1994. In this film for HMD 2014 Appolinaire tells us about his journey of escape from the Genocide.
Appolinaire Kageruka is a survivor of the Genocide in Rwanda. In this Untold Stories film he describes how he hid from the killers, and how he witnessed the aftermath of thousands of people's murder in a church.
'20 years later, the horrors I lived through seem distant. But I continued to have flashbacks and at times I have nightmares about being hunted down by the killers.'
Eric played for Kigali’s top football team. During the Genocide in Rwanda his fellow players protected him from the killing. Today Eric runs an organisation which uses football to promote tolerance, unity and reconciliation among Rwandan youth.
Henriette Mutegwaraba was born in 1972 in the Butare province of Rwanda. Her parents were farmers and owned land. She was the firstborn of the family and had two brothers and three sisters. She was 24 when the Genocide in Rwanda took place.
Freddy was 18 when the Genocide in Rwanda began. Only he and his sister survived from his family. In this testimony Freddy describes how his family were killed, and how he survived.
This podcast explores the story of Jean Louis Mazimpaka and his experiences during the Genocide in Rwanda.
In this transcript of her speech to the UK HMD 2013 Commemorative Event, Sophie Masereka describes how she survived the Genocide in Rwanda.
Adrien Niyonshuti is an Olympic Mountain Biker for Team Rwanda. He survived the Genocide in Rwanda in 1994, but lost many of his family and loved ones. We went to meet Adrien at his training camp and he told us what it meant to him to be representing Rwanda at London 2012.
Mussa Uwitonze became an orphan at the age of six after being separated from his family during the Genocide in Rwanda. He was raised in an orphanage, and it was there that he was first handed a camera, a moment that fuelled his lifelong passion for photography.
In this testimony survivor of the Genocide in Rwanda Beatha Uwazaninka talks about life before 1994, and how she survived 100 terrifying days of Genocide. She explains how she sees Rwanda today, and what she thinks about forgiving the people who killed her family.
Hasan Hasanović was 19 when the town of Srebrenica fell to Bosnian Serb forces in July 1995. He endured a 100 kilometre march through hostile terrain to escape the massacre of over 7,000 Muslim men and boys that took place there.
Nisad was imprisoned in the notorious Omarska Concentration Camp along with four of his brothers. Today he lives in London, is married with two children and works as a civil engineer.
This testimony has been provided to HMDT by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. Bosnian Muslim Besima describes returning to the home she was forced from in Prijedor, and confronting the people farming her land.
This testimony has been provided to the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. In this testimony Kemal remembers the day the Serb army rolled into the village.
Kemal Pervanić and his family were Muslims living in Kevljani, Bosnia. In 1992 Bosnian Serb forces imprisoned Kemal and his brother in the notorious Omarska concentration camp. As part of our 2011 Hidden Histories project Kemal showed us a photograph of his family which survived the Bosnian war.
This testimony has been provided to HMDT by Kemal Pervanić, a survivor of the Bosnian war, who has specially edited three short testimony films taken from his new film Pretty Village. In the film Šero recounts being taken away to be tortured: 'One day they decided they decided that we were in the way they would be better off without us'.
Safet is a Bosnian Muslim and survivor of the ethnic cleansing in Prijedor, Bosnia. His father and brother were imprisoned by the Bosnian Serb army in concentration camps.
Abdulsalam sought asylum in the UK after experiencing violence at the hands of the Sudanese Government in their attacks against the black population in the Darfur region of Sudan. Abdulsalam shares his testimony in the hope that the raising awareness will provoke the world into responding to the genocide that continues to unfold there today.
Karim was born in Darfur in 1972 and grew up in the countryside near El Geneina. He comes from the Zaghawa tribe. Karim has two sisters and four brothers. His father was a farmer. Before the world came to know about the genocide in Darfur, Karim’s village was attacked.
In this testimony Darfuri survivor Abdul describes the murder of his father, being imprisoned and tortured, and escaping to the UK.
Hawa is a survivor of ethnic cleansing in Darfur, Sudan. In this Untold Stories film she talks about the persecution that caused her to leave her village and her fears for her family.
Astrid Aghajanian was a little girl when Ottoman Empire began it's systematic destruction of its Armenian population. In this testimony Astrid describes what happened to her father, and how she and her mother survived deportation into the Syrian desert.
Satenig Ehranjian survived the attempt of the Ottoman Empire to destroy all of Armenian culture and peoples in 1915-1918. Her mother died and her sister disappeared on the forced journey they made after being expelled from their village.
In this educational resource for secondary age students, Blanche Benedick tells her story of escape from the Nazis. Blanche's family were Jewish and lived in Nazi-occupied Denmark - they were helped to escape to Sweden by Danish and Swedish people who risked their lives to help them make the crossing by boat.
Nine year old Martha Blend escaped from Austria on the Kindertransport in 1938, leaving her parents behind. As part of our 2011 Hidden Histories project Martha showed us her autograph book which she brought to the UK with her.
Nine year old Martha Blend excaped from Austria on the Kindertransport in 1938, leaving her parents behind. Here she describes her life in Austria, the journey to the UK, and the fate of her family left behind.
Wolf Blomfield came to Britain as a Kindertransport boy in March 1939, when he had just turned ten. In this testimony he describes his journey, the reasons for leaving, and his life since leaving his father behind.
In this podcast we talk to Leisel Carter. Leisel left Germany at the age of four in 1939, before war broke out. She travelled through Norway to escape to safety in England. Incredibly, she travelled part of the journey alone.
In this podcast Kindertransportee Martin Kapel describes how his family was forced into Poland from Germany by the Nazis, and his journey on the Kindertransport by ship from Poland to England.
Lady Milena was born in Czechoslovakia in 1929. Her father was recommended to leave Czechoslovakia the day before the Nazis invaded because he was both Jewish and a supporter of an anti-Nazi author.
Albert Friedlander was 11 years old in 1938 and living in Berlin. On the night of 9-10 November, the Nazis organised a night of violence and destruction against Jewish buildings and properties. As a Jewish boy, Albert had distinct memories of that time.
Susanne Kenton is a Kindertransport refugee. Born Susanne Flanter in Berlin, where she spent the first 13 years of her life, Susanne was driven to flee her country of birth by the rise of Nazism and the horrors of Kristallnacht.
Ann Kirk was born in Berlin, Germany in 1928. In 1933 the Nazis came to power and everything changed for Ann and her family. After the Kristallnacht pogrom in 1938, when Ann was 10, she travelled to the UK alone on the Kindertransport.
Bob Kirk was born in Hanover, Germany in 1925. In 1933 the Nazis came to power and everything changed for Bob and his family. After the Kristallnacht pogrom in 1938, at the age of 13, Bob travelled to the UK alone on the Kindertransport.
Collage artist Martin O’Neill and animator Andrew Griffin met Holocaust survivor Bettine Le Beau at her north London home, as part of the HMD 2015 Memory Makers project. Bettine survived the Holocaust in France as a child, and went on to become a Bond girl and film star. This is Martin and Andrew’s visual and animated response to Bettine’s story. Bettine died in September 2015.
Eve was born in Germany, and was seven years old in 1938 when Kristallnacht – the night of the broken glass – took place. Her family was torn apart by the Nazis, her parents survived concentration camps, her youngest sister forced into hiding, and Eve and her other sister sent to America and into foster homes. Remarkably, they were all reunited in 1946.
Bernd Koschland was born in Germany in 1931. Shortly after the persecution of the Jews by the Nazis began Bernd travelled to England alone on the Kindertransport. Here Bernd recollects his experiences and how they have influenced his life. He feels that it is important to share his experiences with people on Holocaust Memorial Day. Throughout his testimony Bernd uses the term Jewish ‘FTSE’ as a metaphor for his sense of Jewish identity.
Joan Salter is a child survivor of the Holocaust. Born Fanny Zimetbaum in Brussels on 15 February 1940 to Polish Jewish parents, she was three months old when Belgium was invaded by the Nazis.
Vera Schaufeld, formerly Vera Lowyova, was saved by a man who refused to stand by, Sir Nicholas Winton. She was born in Prague in 1930. In May 1939, following the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia, Vera was told that she must move to England on her own. She was only nine years old.
Margret is a German Jewish Refugee. She fled Nazi persecution, leaving her family behind and then settled in the UK. In this Untold Stories film she speaks about the perseuction which drove her family from Germany, how she escaped to England, and the fate of her relatives left behind to face the Holocaust.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B8 - experiences in a concentration camp.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B30 - deportation to Poland.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B74 - vandalism and arrest.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B78 - destruction of shops and synagogues.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B104 - attacks on shops and homes.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B156 - theft, humiliation and cruelty.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account B243 - a plea for help from abroad from a 17 year old whose family was devastated by Kristallnacht.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account P.II.d. 98 - protecting the Torah scrolls, and organised burglary from the witness' home.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account P. II d. 195 - injuries, destitution, and accommodating three families in one flat.
Eye-witness accounts held by the Wiener Library taken immediately following the state-sanctioned campaign of hatred against Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe on the 9/10 November 1938 were translated for the first time to mark the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass). Account P.II.d.751 - police refuse to assist when a mob attacks a Jewish home.
Gino Bartali was an Italian cycling legend having won the gruelling Tour de France twice, once prior to and once after World War Two. But the true heroism of Bartali’s actions went far beyond his prowess on the bike, as he used his sporting fame to help save the lives of many Jewish people.
Sydney and Golda Bourne (previously Baum) saved the life of one Jewish German girl by agreeing to look after her as part of the Kindertransport program. Today, Susanne Kenton and her family remember the people who enabled her to survive in the face of genocide and tyranny
Jef van Bebber was a Dutch Roman Catholic who sheltered numerous Jewish people in his house over two years between 1942 and 1944. His house was raided and Jef was sent to a concentration camp, where he was executed.
Frank Foley who was born in 1884, worked for the Foreign Office and became Head of the British Passport Control Office in Germany. Foley was in fact Britain’s most senior spy in Berlin. During his time in Berlin, Foley is known to have saved an estimated 10,000 German Jews. This remarkable man also visited internment camps to get Jewish people out, hide them in his home, and helped forge passports.
Dr Feng Shan Ho was a Chinese diplomat posted to Vienna, Austria. After Austria's annexation by the Nazis, Ho issued thousands of visas to Austrian Jews, enabling them to escape Nazi Persecution. Yad Vashem in Jerusalem awarded Feng-Shan Ho the title of ‘Righteous Among the Nations’ for his humanitarian courage.
This 2013 educational resource for secondary school aged students tells the story of Miep Gies, the woman who supported Anne Frank and her family when they were in hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam.
Paul Grüninger was a policeman and footballer in Switzerland who helped thousands of Austrian Jews fleeing persecution. He illegally allowed them to cross the border to Switzerland between August 1938 and April 1939. He was recognised as a Righteous Among the Nations in 1971, a year before his death.
Eva Jirankova led a privileged life in Prague before the Nazi invasion. However in 1942 her husband Miloš Jiránek, a prominent Czech cultural figure, was arrested and imprisoned in a concentration camp. He survived nearly three years of incarceration and a four month death march. Eva speaks about this in this testimony.
In this podcast we speak to Monica Porter, the daughter of Vali Rácz, an exceptional and courageous woman who risked her life to save Jews in Hungary during the Second World War.
During the Holocaust many Albanian Muslims chose to rescue and protect Jewish people. One of those was shop owner Ali Sheqer Pashkaj.
Irena Sendlerowa was a social worker in Warsaw, who directed a children’s rescue group to smuggle Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto - providing them with false papers and placing them with substitute Polish families. Records that Irena kept showed that she was able to save nearly 2,500 children from certain death under the Nazis.
Carl Wilkens was the only US citizen to stay in the Rwandan capital of Kigali during the 1994 genocide. This interview explores the story of how he, with the support of his wife Teresa, chose not to stand by when the Hutu extremists aimed to wipe out the Tutsi presence from the country.
Five students from Munich University and one of their professors challenged the Nazi regime by forming the White Rose group and beginning a secret campaign. They asked the German people to react to the violence and oppression which were all around them by standing up and fighting for freedom. In June 1942 four leaflets, published in quick succession, with the title Leaflets of the White Rose appeared all over the city of Munich.
In May 1939 the SS St Louis left the port of Hamburg in Germany and set sail for Havana in Cuba. On board were 937 Jewish passengers. They were German Jews fleeing Nazi persecution and hoping to start new lives. They planned to seek asylum in Cuba. This 2011 education case study tells the story of the passengers and Captain Gustav Schroeder.
Sir Nicholas Winton was born in Hampstead, London in 1909. For nine months in 1939 he rescued 669 children from Czechoslovakia, bringing them to the UK, thereby sparing them from the horrors of the Holocaust. Sir Nicholas died in July 2015, aged 106.
The 6 million + installation, which contains over six million buttons, has caught the imagination of thousands of people, inspiring a Yorkshire local authority to build the region’s first permanent Holocaust memorial.
The Holocaust Centre was founded in 1995 by the Smith family, at their farmhouse in rural Nottinghamshire. Survivor talks, education sessions and two permanent exhibitions are housed within the Centre, which is surrounded by over an acre of beautifully landscaped memorial gardens.
Berge Kanikanian was born in England in 1968, and has learning difficulties. He was inspired to make a film about Aktion T4, the Nazi programme which attempted to murder German citizens who had mental or physical disabilities. He tells us about his Journey.
Dr Mukesh Kapila CBE became the head of the United Nations’ operations in Sudan in 2003. He was based in the capital, Khartoum, and witnessed the Sudanese Government’s campaign to eliminate black African communities in the western region of the country known as Darfur.
British diplomat Mukesh Kapila was head of the UN in Sudan and witnessed the start of the genocide in Darfur in April 2004. In this Untold Stories film he speaks about how he alerted the international media to what was happening.
Iolo Lewis was part of the British 11th Armoured Division, which liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in April 1945. Iolo wrote a poem based on his experience called 'Belsen Silence'.
Holocaust survivor Raphael Lemkin coined the word ‘genocide’ and helped establish the term in international law. Shocked and saddened by massacres throughout history, as well as the murder of his family by the Nazis, he longed for accountability for deplorable acts committed by countries within their own borders, campaigning tirelessly to reach his goal.
The Srebrenica memorial centre was created in October 2000, barely five years after the genocide that took place there. The cemetery, which now holds over 5,000 of the 8,000 victims, has since been joined by a memorial room and exhibition. In spite of local controversy, it has encouraged many survivors to return to the town, and draws in visitors and dignitaries from across the world to hear its message.
Brian Steidle was a US monitor attached to the African Union peacekeeping mission in Sudan. In 2004 he was sent to Darfur, where he witnessed horrendous crimes committed by fighters backed by the Sudanese Government. Brian has made a book and a film about Darfur to raise awareness of the Genocide taking place there.
Josh Whatsize is the Lead Holocaust Memorial Day Youth Champion. Here he explains why he is passionate about keeping the memories of survivors alive for a new generation.
Pete suffered a hate crime on the basis of his disability. For HMD 2016 we explore contemporary hate crimes and examine the responsibility we all have to stand up to intolerance and prejudice.
Benn experienced a hate crime on the basis of his sexuality. For HMD 2016 we explore contemporary hate crimes and examine the responsibility we all have to stand up to intolerance and prejudice.
Asma suffered an incident of anti-Muslim hate. For HMD 2016 we explore contemporary hate crimes and examine the responsibility we all have to stand up to intolerance and prejudice.
Ali is an Iraqi asylum seeker and gay rights activist facing death threats for his work. In this Untold Stories film he talks about escaping Iraq but how he still faces persecution in the UK.
In this film Vicky Botton, Chair of the East Notts Travellers Association describes her experience of discrimination and violence against gypsies in the UK.
Fashion photographer Michel Haddi found himself the target of hate crime when a swastika was painted on his door. In the Untold Stories film he speaks about his diverse background, the discrimination he has faced as a result, and the effect the incident had on him and his family.
The Bock Family has spent most of their lives fleeing persecution and prejudice, because they are Romany. In this interview the members of the family describe their family story - including deportation to Nazi death camps, and more recent experiences of persecution and prejudice in the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
The Bock Family has spent most of their lives fleeing persecution and prejudice, because they are Romany. In this interview the members of the family describe their family story - including deportation to Nazi death camps, and more recent experiences of persecution and prejudice in the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
The Welsh translation of the Holocaust Memorial Day 2015 life stories.
Welsh language translations of eight HMD 2016 Life Stories.